FANDOM


Collared Peccary
5322255364 54fb6eaf1e z
Information
Common Name Javelina, Saíno, Báquiro, Musk Hog, Mexican Hog, Javelina, and Quenk
Range North, Central, and South America.
Scientific Classification
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Mammalia
Order Artiodactyla
Family Tayassuidae
Genus Pecari
Species Pecari tajacu
Conservation Status
LCSpecies
Least Concern

The Collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), is a species of peccary in the Tayassuidae family found North, Central, and South America. They are commonly referred to as javelina, saíno or báquiro, although these terms are also used to describe other species in the family. The species is also known as the musk hog, Mexican hog, and javelina. In Trinidad, it is colloquially known as quenk.

Although somewhat related to the pigs and frequently referred to as one, this species and the other peccaries are no longer classified in the Suidae family.

Description

The collared peccary stands around 510–610 millimetres (20–24 in) tall at the shoulder and about 1.0–1.5 m (3 ft 3 in–4 ft 11 in) long. It weighs between 16 and 27 kg (35 and 60 lb). The peccary contains small tusks that point toward the ground when the collared peccary is upright. It also has slender legs with a robust or stocky body. The tail is often hidden in the coarse fur of the peccary.

Range and Habitat

The collared peccary is a widespread creature found throughout much of the tropical and subtropical Americas, ranging from the Southwestern United States to northern Argentina in South America. The only Caribbean island where it is native, however, is Trinidad, although introduced populations exist in Cuba. It inhabits deserts and xeric shrublands, tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands, flooded grasslands and savannas, tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests, and several other habitats, as well. In addition, it is well adapted to habitats shared by humans, merely requiring sufficient cover; they can be found in cities and agricultural land throughout their range, where they consume garden plants. Notable populations are known to exist in the suburbs of Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona.

Diet

Collared peccaries normally feed on cactus, mesquite beans, fruits, roots, tubers, palm nuts, grasses, invertebrates, and small vertebrates. In areas inhabited by humans, they will also consume cultivated crops and ornamental plants, such as tulip bulbs.

Behavior

Collared peccaries are diurnal creatures that live in groups of up to 50 individuals, averaging between six and 9 members. They frequently sleep at night in burrows, often under the roots of trees, but sometimes they can be found in caves or under logs.

Although they usually ignore humans, they will react if they feel threatened. They defend themselves with their long tusks, which can sharpen themselves whenever their mouths open or close. A collared peccary will release a strong musk or give a sharp bark if it is alarmed.

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.